I.    Local Workforce Investment Area Profile  I-1

II.   Strategic Planning   II-1

Section II-A - Local Area Strategic Planning Process  II-2

1.   Economic Environment and Key Workforce Issues  II-2

2.   Engaging Community Partners in Workforce Solutions  II-3

3.   Aligning Service Delivery  II-3

4.   Measuring Achievement II-4

Section II-B - Local Area Strategic Planning Progress  II-5

1.   Summary of Progress  II-5

2.   Aligning Service Delivery  II-6

3.   Measuring Achievement II-7

III.  Integration of WIA Compliance with Strategic Planning   III-1

Subsection 1  III-3

1.   Local Plan Submission  III-3

2.   Governance and Board Composition  III-3

3.   Fiscal Agent and Grant Subrecipient III-6

4.   Direct Services & Infrastructure Plan  III-6

Subsection 2  III-9

1.   Selecting and Certifying Operators  III-9

2.   Contracting for Service Providers  III-9

3.   Priority of Service  III-10

4.   Self-Sufficiency  III-10

5.   Supportive Services and Needs-Related Payments  III-11

6.   Grievances and Complaints  III-12

7.   Youth Services  III-13

8.   WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker and Wagner-Peyser Services  III-19

9.  WIA IB & Title III PY05 Performance and System Indicators  III-29

10. Local Monitoring  III-33

11. Open Meetings  III-34

12. Public Comment on Local Plan  III-34

IV. Required Certifications and Documents  IV-1

ATTACHMENT A:  REQUEST FOR EXTENSION TO SUBMIT LOCAL PLAN  IV-2

ATTACHMENT B:  TIMELINE FOR SUBMITTING COMPLETE LOCAL PLAN  IV-3

ATTACHMENT C:  SIGNATURE OF LOCAL BOARD CHAIR  IV-4

ATTACHMENT D:  SIGNATURE OF CHIEF ELECTED OFFICIAL  IV-6

ATTACHMENT E:  UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT  IV-7

ATTACHMENT F:  FISCAL AGENT/GRANT SUBRECIPIENT  IV-8

ATTACHMENT G:  ONE STOP OPERATOR INFORMATION  IV-9

ATTACHMENT H:  FEDERAL AND STATE CERTIFICATIONS  IV-10

V.  Review Process  V-1


I.       Local Workforce Investment Area Profile

By its very composition, the Local Workforce Investment Board (Local Board) facilitates a partnership approach to meeting the needs of business, providing career opportunities for workers, and assuring meaningful education and employment experiences for youth.  Board composition should align with an approach to workforce development which recognizes workforce development as an economic development tool.

 

The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) requirement to develop a Comprehensive Local Plan (Local Plan) offers Local Boards the opportunity to re-evaluate their current system’s delivery of employment and training services in light of economic shifts, new initiatives, new mandates, and its vision for the economic and workforce development of the area.  In accordance with the flexibility granted to the states, this planning guidance is provided to assist local areas in the development of a three-year plan.  Creating a meaningful three-year plan is an opportunity for the Local Board to reprioritize and incorporate changes into a local system that will guide and inform the delivery of services over the next three years.  The Local Plan is the key to supporting strategic activities that will result in achieving a workforce system that provides high quality services to its business and job-seeking customers. 

 

Strategic planning for your local area should also include a regional focus.  To the extent that local areas share similar population trends, emerging or declining industries, education resources, transportation needs and other economic or workforce challenges or to the extent that regional planning efforts could result in the sharing of labor market information or the provision of services across boundaries, it will be beneficial to include a regional outlook and perspective in this plan development.

 

Planning strategically for the future requires an assessment of the previous five-year plan and how effective the plan was in accommodating the needs of the current workforce system.  The evolution of the local workforce system through the previous five-year plan is the foundation for determining how the local area will move forward in providing services, meeting performance standards and meeting the economic and workforce challenges of the communities it serves. 

 


Local Workforce Investment Area Profile

 

 

1.  Provide an overview of the current population in your local workforce investment area:

 

#

 

122,377

Population (Total, all ages)

 

 

#

81,561

Population of labor force age  (15-64)

 

#

19,167

Population age 15-24 (Emerging labor force)

#

26,941

Population age 0-14 (Children)

 

Comment on the challenges that have emerged as a result of population shifts and trends and the changing demographics and characteristics of the local workforce.  Describe how the One Stop system will response to these challenges.

 

Oswego County’s population has and is expected to continue to remain stable.  However, the availability of qualified workers will become a significant concern.  The population will trend similarly to the rest of the nation with growth of the group nearing or ready for retirement.  The number of Generation X’ers is half that of boomers with many not wanting to remain in the area after graduation.   The Workforce Board has identified four industry clusters expected to grow in the local labor market (described in the strategic planning section of this plan).  The One stop system will respond to these challenges by developing strategies to prepare the labor pool for anticipated job openings.   Attracting and retaining the next generation talent pool is also a main focus.

 

 

Note:  The population data requested is Census 2000 data.  It may be found on the following website:  http://www.census.gov.  Click on American FactFinder.  Select your state.  Then type your county or city; click Go.  An age breakdown of the population is available by clicking on “show more.”

 

 

 

Provide the annual average unemployment rates and labor force participation rates for the past five Calendar Years (CY).

 

 

 CY 2001

 CY2002

CY 2003

CY 2004

 

Unemployment rate (%)

 

5.4%

6.5%

7.4%

6.9%

Labor Force

58,700

59,300

59,800

59,900

      Employment

55,500

55,400

55,400

55,800

      Unemployment

3,100

3,800

4,400

4,100


 

 

Provide the total number of WIA Adults, WIA Dislocated Workers, WIA Older Youth, WIA Younger Youth and Wagner-Peyser funded customers served by your LWIA for the past four years and planned service levels for PY 05.

 

 

 

Total Number Served

 

PY 01

 

PY 02

 

PY 03

 

PY 04

Planned

PY 05

 

WIA Adults

219

289

538

229

280

 

WIA Dislocated Workers

230

246

276

178

290

 

WIA Older Youth

71

58

27

20

50

 

WIA Younger Youth

177

209

195

153

195

 

Wagner-Peyser Funded Customers*

NA

6,499

4,887

3,414

4,405

 

 

Note:   The total numbers served for WIA Title IB are in the WIA Annual Reports.

 

         PY04 WIA Title IB data is found through the most recent WIA Quarterly Report.

 

*Please consult with the Wagner-Peyser LWIB member for assistance in obtaining and understanding Wagner-Peyser numbers. 

 

 

 

 

2.   The local One Stop system, as defined through our local One Stop recertification process, is currently composed of:

 

 

#

1

Certified Full-Service One Stop Centers

 

#

4

Affiliate Sites (as defined by your local area)

 

#

3

Other Access Points to the system (e.g., through means such as electronic access, partners, libraries, etc.)

 

 

Describe the criteria used to identify Affiliate Sites.

 

An affiliate site in the Career Connection network of workforce development services has the ability to provide information to job seeking and business customers on the primary services of the workforce development system.  To be designated as a Career Connection affiliate site, an entity must be able to:

·        Deliver at least one of the core services.

·        Obtain and maintain the appropriate technology.

·        Meet the criteria for the Customer and Market Focus quality standard.

·        Meet the criteria for the Information and Analysis quality standard.

·        Meet the criteria for the Process Management quality standard.

 

Describe how the scope of the One Stop system has evolved over the duration of the previous five-year plan and identify how the system’s ability to sustain and grow services has been impacted by available federal resources and the board’s ability to leverage resources. 

 

In the original five-year plan, the Board identified three sites (Fulton- Oswego County Division of Employment & Training, Oswego- NYSDOL, and Mexico- DET), as potential One-Stop Centers.  Fulton and Mexico went on to become franchised centers.  Due budget constraints, Center operations were consolidated in Fulton in 2004, with Mexico becoming an affiliate site.

 

In reaction to local demands, the board identified the need to expand the services    available to business and job seeker customers.  Assistance has been provided to businesses by helping them to assess the skills of their current workforce, and provide assistance to upgrade these skills.  The One Stop Center has been host to on-site business recruitments, allowing businesses to have employment needs met and providing opportunities for job seeking customers.  Recruitment and screening services have been provided for local business.   The system also developed customized training packages with local business designed to meet their training needs and allow them to remain competitive in the labor market.  Resources leveraged to meet the training needs have included the addition of Trade Act funding, funding through local business (e.g. Carrier funds) and various grant funds (e.g. Entrepreneurial Services, Assessing Local Skill Shortages grants).

 

 

What are the Board’s plans to adjust services available through its One Stop system based on their projection of available resources?

 

By the end of 2005, our local DOL office in Oswego will be closed.  DOL staff will be relocated to the Fulton One-Stop.  Other partners plan on increasing their presence in the System by hosting more events, and providing staff to the Center on a regular basis.

 

In 2004, we formed a Business Services Team, which has representation from all of the partner agencies.  The Board will be looking to this team to take on a lead role in providing services to businesses.

 

 

 

 


 

3.  List the mandated and non-mandated partner programs which have been “key” to supporting your system during the past five years through cash, in-kind resources and/or through the integration of staff to provide workforce services at the One Stop centers.  Here, the term One Stop system refers to the workforce, educational and human service entities which receive public funding to collaborate on the delivery of services designed to improve the employment outcomes of its customers.

 

 

   1)

NYS Department of Labor

 

 

   2)

VESID

 

 

   3)

Oswego County Opportunities

 

 

   4)

Oswego Industries

 

 

   5)

Oswego County BOCES

Oswego County Social Services

Cayuga Community College

Oswego County Department of Employment & Training

Operation Oswego County

SUNY Oswego SBDC

 

 

 

 

 

      Identify the mandated and non-mandated partner programs whose active participation in the One Stop system and One Stop centers the Board seeks to strengthen over the next three years through enhanced efforts to leverage resources and integrate staff :

 

 

   1)

Department of Labor

 

 

   2)

Cayuga Community College

 

 

   3)

Oswego Industries- Career Employment Services

 

 

   4)

VESID

 

 

   5)

Consumer Credit Counseling

 

 

 

 

 

Identify non traditional partners, including economic development, faith based and certain community organizations, with whom the Board plans to initiate or strengthen its relationship in furtherance of the strategic objectives set forth in the plan:

 

 

   1)

Integrated Community Planning, Inc (CBO)

 

 

   2)

Rural Health Network (a subsidiary of ICP)

 

 

   3)

Operation Oswego County, Inc. (non-profit, county designated economic development agency)

 

 

   4)

Greater Oswego Chamber of Commerce

 

 

   5)

Chamber Alliance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.  Beyond standard WIA formula allocation, identify other grants, awards and funds that the local area has leveraged to support workforce needs and, in particular, training initiatives in the local area (e.g., state-level WIA grants, state funded grants, private/foundation grants, private sector support that provide additional funding to the area’s budget). Identify by funding source and total dollar amount.

 

Beyond the standard WIA formula, we have secured (or assisted businesses secure) the following funding:

 

Accelerate NY- $44,000 (NYSDOL)

Entrepreneurial Services in the One-Stop System- $25,000 (NYSDOL)

Support funding for Next Generation Consulting study (part of Strategic Planning Project) - $15,000 (Operation Oswego County)

Manufacturing Grant- Alcan- $283,027 (NYSDOL)

Manufacturing Grant- Agrilink- $251,434 (NYSDOL)

Assessing Local Skills Shortages (Phase I)- $25,000 (NYSDOL)

Assessing Local Skills Shortages (Phase II)- $88,750 (NYSDOL)

Strategic Planning for a Human Capital Advantage- $100,000 (NYSDOL)

BUSINYS- Pathfinder Bank- $85,200 (NYSDOL)

BUSINYS- Interface Solutions- $59,300 (NYSDOL)

BUSINYS- Davis-Standard, LLC- $50,000 (NYSDOL)

SMART (Small Manufacturer)- Canfield Tool- $38,320 (NYSDOL)

STRAP Grant- SONOCO- $50,000 (Empire State Development)

STRAP Grant- Black Clawson- $66,650 (Empire State Development)

 

 

 

5.   Identify challenges the Board encountered during the past five years in supporting the local workforce system infrastructure.  Describe the Board’s strategies to work through those challenges over the next three years.

 

      The consolidation of the Oswego County DET operations into one location (Fulton), and local DOL’s decision to close their Oswego office, have made it necessary to change the Board’s original vision of three One-Stop Centers, geographically spread throughout the County.  The former One-Stop location in Mexico has applied to be franchised as an affiliate site.  The Board remains committed to maintaining a presence in the city of Oswego, although a firm action plan has yet to be determined.

 

 

 

6.   Describe the key sectors which will help shape the workforce policies of the Local Board throughout this three-year plan.  Identify the skills essential to the growth of these sectors and how existing skill assessments of the local workforce align with the emerging workforce demands in your regional economy.

 

      As identified by our State of the Workforce Report and Strategic Plan, Energy, Hospitality, Manufacturing and Health Care are the key industry clusters to sustain and grow the local economy.  Our local skill assessments indicate that we need to improve skill levels in math and science, workplace and other soft skills, entrepreneurship, hospitality and customer service.

 

 

 

7.   Highlight noteworthy business customer services which evolved over the past five years and any other business services that will be meaningful in attracting new business customers.  (Business service examples include activities such as recruitment and placement, workforce training, employee assessment, pre-screening of jobseekers, business related workshops.)

 

      In the previous five-year period, Customized Training was implemented with seven businesses.  Nearly 185 workers upgraded their skills and some increased their earnings an average of 10%.  Business services have formed a greater part of the services mix in recent years. These services include assistance with recruitment; pre-screening and referral of job applicants; information and access to grant opportunities such as BUSINYS; and tax credits like the Worker Opportunity Tax Credit.  More businesses   are also using the One Stop center to conduct on site recruitments.

 

 

 

8.   Describe any successes that have helped to enhance your local area’s system, broker new partnerships, or respond to workforce or community needs.

 

      Expansion in business services has resulted in more successes for job seekers in the One Stop.  In the past, most interactions with businesses have occurred when doing individual On-the-Job Training contracts.  Since marketing a variety of business services, recruitment and screening activities have become popular.   In one company, almost 900 people were screened resulting in 200 being hired.

 

 

II.     Strategic Planning

During 2003, the NYSDOL provided local workforce investment areas with the opportunity to receive a grant to incentivize them toward the achievement of local and regional coordination of WIA activities.  Most local areas responded to the Strategic Planning for a Human Capital Advantage grant announcement and were subsequently provided with funds to either support the initiation of strategic planning activities or to aid the local area in the continuation of a process already underway.  As part of their strategic planning process, many grant recipients created a State of the Workforce report which summarized past efforts and accomplishments, analyzed the current trends and emerging workforce and economic issues and established a vision for the future.

 

Section II of this Local Plan guidance, Strategic Planning, is provided in two segments.  You will complete only one segment, Section II-A or Section II-B, depending upon your responses to the following questions.

 

1.      Were you awarded the NYSDOL funded Strategic Planning for a Human Capital Advantage grant?

 

2.      Have you achieved the third benchmark of that project and received the third payment under the grant?

 

If you answer “No” to either or both of the two questions, provide your local strategic planning by completing Section II-A on page II-2 and do not complete Section II-B.

 

If you answer “Yes” to both questions, provide your local strategic planning progress by completing Section II-B on page II-5 and do not complete Section II-A.

 


Section II-A - Local Area Strategic Planning Process

This section of the plan is to be completed by those local workforce investment areas that have not participated in the Strategic Planning for a Human Capital Advantage project or who have participated, but have not achieved benchmark number three (receipt of a third payment from the State) in their strategic planning process.

 

            N/A

Section II-B - Local Area Strategic Planning Progress

This section of the plan is to be completed by those local workforce areas that have engaged in the State’s Strategic Planning for a Human Capital Advantage project and have achieved at least benchmark number three (receipt of a third payment from the State).

1.      Summary of Progress

In this section of the plan the local area is asked to describe the outcomes of their strategic planning efforts to date and their plans for continuing and measuring this process.  Within your response, address the following points:

 

·         How will the Board have used its State of the Workforce report as a basis for future One Stop system planning?

·         What key workforce issues and gaps have emerged and how have they been prioritized?

·         What goals have been established around each of these issues, both short term (first year) and longer term (second year and third year) and which organization is responsible for each of the goals?

·         What is the role of the Local Board (either leading or supporting another entity) for each of these goals? 

·         What progress has been made in achieving each of these goals?  What entity is responsible and what is the process for monitoring progress against each goal and reporting back to stakeholders and the larger community? 

·         What contributions have been made by the Local Board and by the partners to support this effort?

·         How will the Local Board sustain the momentum of these partnerships and alliances?  What are the plans to continue to engage existing partners and expand strategic planning efforts to include other stakeholders not currently engaged?

·         Has the Local Board identified any areas in which the State, through its various state administrative agencies, can assist the local system efforts in attaining its goals?  If so, in what manner and how has that been communicated?

 

We have just recently completed the Strategic Planning process.  We are in the process of developing an implementation plan.  Our basic strategy will be to divide the implementation into five sections, the four targeted industry clusters and the Young Professionals. 

 

Our first step is to share our plan with the system partners and the community at large.  We have already presented to the Workforce Board, the SUNY Oswego’s Provost Council, the County Strategic Planning and Economic Development & Tourism Committees, and the Board of Operation Oswego County.  We plan to share the plan with the County Legislature, the BOCES Board, school boards, and local Chambers of Commerce and civic organizations.

 

Our office will take the lead on implementing the Energy, Manufacturing, and Hospitality clusters.  We have approached the Rural Health Network, a consortium of local health care providers, to take the lead for that cluster.  We have convened a facilitated session among a group of Young Professionals, and will work with that group on implementation.

 

We have received funding support from NYSDOL to support a career mapping initiative for two of the four targeted industry clusters.  We also plan to submit grant applications to various other public and private funding sources to support implementation.

 

Progress on the implementation of the plan will be reported to the various Workforce Board Committees, particularly the Business Development, Skills and Training, and Youth committees.   The Skills & Training Committee has started to review our local Demand Occupation List to ensure that it is consistent with the jobs within the targeted industry clusters.  This committee will drive the policy decisions around the utilization of WIA dollars for training.

2.      Aligning Service Delivery

In order to address workforce issues within the local area, Local Boards need to utilize collaborative efforts with One Stop partners and other stakeholders to align programs and services.  In this section of the plan discuss how your local area is achieving alignment of service delivery around the issues and goals previously described in the above section.  Within your response, address the following points:

 

·         How will strategic planning enable your local One Stop system to go beyond compliance and address the economic development needs and key workforce issues identified in your local workforce area or region?

·         How is your One Stop system structure helping to facilitate the achievement of the stated goals?  

·         Describe how your local area’s service delivery to businesses has been aligned to respond to local market demand and the goals set forth from your strategic planning efforts. 

·         Describe how you assure that the delivery of core, intensive, and training services is aligned around identified workforce issues and stated goals.  How are these services integrated in the overall workforce plan?

 

The strategic planning process has provided us with a definite focus in terms of a sector approach, with our targeted industry clusters as priorities.  For example, if we want to sell Oswego County as the Energy capital of New York State, we need to support that industry’s current and future workforce needs.

 

Our strategic plan outlines strategies to support theses industries.  Our strategic planning process relied a great deal on the participation of representatives of each of the clusters to help not only identify the needs, but also some strategies.

 

Policies to be developed by our Skills & Training Committee will provide guidance to our Business Services Team, which has representatives from all partner agencies.  

3.      Measuring Achievement

More than ever before the ability to sustain and grow a local workforce system depends upon how effectively the local area can demonstrate in measurable terms that the system is achieving its goals.  In addition to meeting the mandatory negotiated WIA performance levels, Local Boards must be able to show to their constituents, customers, stakeholders, private and public sector partners that resources are being used effectively and invested for greater workforce and economic gains in the community.

 

Describe how the Local Board is implementing performance measures that relate to the goals established around the key workforce issues identified in its strategic plan.  Within your response, address the following points:

 

·         What data was considered and what entities were involved in helping develop the measures?  Identify the measures and the desired outcomes.

·         If measures have not been developed, what process will you utilize to develop them?  What is the Board’s timeline for development?

·         How will the Local Board benchmark progress toward desired outcomes or definitions of success for these measures?

·        How are these outcomes identified, communicated and utilized to gain additional support or realign services for continuous improvement?

 

Part of the process for developing the tasks for the implementation of the strategic plan will be to identify the measures of success.  As each committee or group meets to establish its tasks or responsibilities associated with implementing the plan, each stakeholder group that participates will be asked the question, “How will we know if we have succeeded?”  The answers to the question will be documented in SMART form (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-oriented, and Time-determined).  These will be identified by the end of 2005, tracked and reported to the Workforce Board and all stakeholders over the next 3 years.


III.        Integration of WIA Compliance with Strategic Planning

The Workforce Investment Act requires that Local Boards establish and approve policies that are in accordance with the Act and its regulations that guarantee a consistent local area approach to One Stop system operations and provide a framework for the delivery of services.  In this section of the plan, the current published policies and working definitions remain in effect and are the basis upon which the next three years policies will evolve.  

 

 

Subsection 1 contains those agreements and policies that are the foundations for administering and evolving the local workforce system.

 

Subsection 2 requests the policies that are and will be essential to the delivery of services and the operation of the local system.

 

In accordance with the Workforce Investment Act, the Local Board is required to conduct business in an open manner and make information regarding the One Stop system available to the public.  Within your discussion of the Local Board’s efforts to openly conduct business, address the following points:

 

·         What is the central location where all local policies and working definitions are published?

·         How does the Board assure that local policies and working definitions, including updates and changes, are readily accessible to One Stop staff, the general public and the State? 

·         Is there a Local Board website?  If yes, please provide the website address. 

·         Does the Local Board make information such as Board membership, meetings, policies, definitions, and other workforce information available on the website? 

·         How is the website maintained to assure up-to-date information is available?

·         By what means does the Board assure that the accessible copies are current?

·         Where can hard copies of this information be obtained by the general public? 

 

All local policies and working definitions are maintained in SUNY Oswego Center for Business and Community Development (CBCD), 103 Rich Hall, SUNY Oswego.  The CBCD houses the staff for the Workforce Board. 

 

Any changes to the By-laws, local policies, and working definitions are approved by a Workforce Board Committee and/or the full Board.  All changes are documented in the meeting minutes.  In addition to being sent to all committee members, copies of the minutes are posted on the website maintained by the One-Stop Operator.  Each committee has a representative from One-Stop Operator staff.  Changes to the By-laws are also copied to the State.

 

The One-Stop Operator maintains the primary website for the local area.  It can be accessed at: http://www.yourcareerconnection.org/.  It contains all of the information regarding the system and the partners.  It contains the names of the current Board members, as well as the meeting calendar for the entire year.  It also posts the minutes from all meetings during the past year, all resolutions, and the State of the Workforce Report and Strategic Plan.  There are also numerous other links to various system partners as well as copies of the monthly newsletter “Connect for Success”.

 

The CBCD also has a website, http://www.oswego.edu/about/centers/cbcd/index.html.  In addition to information about the Board, this site posts the schedule of all upcoming meetings and events.  Board staff maintains this website.  Board staff also reviews both sites on a weekly basis, to ensure that all information is current.

 

The general public can access all information at the Center for Business and Community Development.  Administrative staff maintains the official Board files, and are copied on any changes to the official files.

 

Subsection 1

The responses to this subsection include both narrative responses and the completion of attachments/forms that are located in Section IV, Required Certifications and Documents.

1.      Local Plan Submission

The Local Board is responsible for developing the three-year plan in partnership with the Chief Elected official.  To properly submit the area’s Local Plan:

 

a.   Complete the Attachment C, Signature of Local Board Chair.

 

b.   Complete the Attachment D, Signature of Chief Elected Official, for each unit of local government.

2.      Governance and Board Composition

When a Local Area includes more than one unit of government, the Chief Elected Officials of the individual governmental units must execute an agreement that describes their roles and responsibilities in administering the Act, conducting fiscal and program oversight, and assuring that performance standards are met.  All local areas must provide the following:

 

a.      Complete Attachment E, Units of Local Government, located in Section IV naming the individual governmental unit(s) and identifying the grant recipient.

 

b.      Attach a copy of the agreement that defines the roles and responsibilities of each of the Chief Elected Officials in a multi-jurisdictional area and describes their interaction in the administration of the Workforce Investment Act (if applicable).

 

c.      Attach a copy of the Local Board By-laws.

 

d.      Additionally, please address the following points:

 

·         How often are the by-laws reviewed?  When necessary, what is the process for amending the by-laws? 

·         Is the Board incorporated? 

·         Describe the subcommittee structure for the board and identify the role and responsibilities assigned to each subcommittee.  (You will be asked to identify the subcommittee responsible for each activity addressed in Subsection 2.)

·         What is the plan in place for board member recruitment to reflect current and emerging trends and how is that plan being communicated to local elected officials?

·         What is the process for providing staff to the Local Board?

·         Describe the Local Board’s plan for Board staff retention and development efforts.

 

The Workforce Development Board of Oswego County is incorporated.  The by-laws are reviewed on an “as needed” basis.  Amendments and updates to the by-laws are brought before the Executive Committee.  If approved at the committee level, a resolution is brought before the full board for approval. 

 

Our committee structure is:

 

The Executive Committee is responsible to review, approve and take action as appropriate with regard to the WIA program; review, approve and take action as appropriate with regards to its finances, recommend designation of One Stop System Operator, foster communication and coordination between committees, revise the by-laws, as required, evaluate committee and CEO performance, oversee public relations for the Board, and other responsibilities as designated by the Board.  In addition, the Executive Committee shall be responsible for all financial and insurance aspects including:

a) Reviewing all financial reports/documents as needed but no less than four times per year;

b) Reviewing all insurance policies and making recommendations to the Board as needed;

c) Establishing and reviewing all financial policies.

 

The Business Development Committee responsibilities include:

 

a)      Identifying and monitoring the business services to be provided through the system;

b)      Oversee public relations about business services;

c)      Convene focus groups and community roundtables for identifying future workforce needs as related to economic development;

d)      Identifying available funding and assist in grant writing for employer training needs;

e)      Produce the State of the Workforce Report.

 

The Skills and Training Committee responsibilities include:

a)      Reviewing and approving training programs;

b)      Overseeing training providers inventory;

c)      Evaluating training providers and programs;

d)      Identifying strategies for addressing skill gaps;

e)      Issuing consumer report cards for programs;

f)       Overseeing the implementation of Work Keys in Oswego County;

g)      Monitoring training program performance data.

 

The Evaluation and Franchising Committee responsibilities include:

a)      Overseeing the One Stop Operator;

b)      Setting standards for centers and affiliates;

c)      Franchising centers and affiliates

d)      Monitoring continuous quality improvement and job seeker customer satisfaction in centers and affiliates;

e)      Promoting the franchised centers and affiliates using the Workforce New York branding;

f) Monitoring system performance.

 

The Youth Council responsibilities include:

a)      Assisting in developing the local workforce plan pertaining to youth and youth services;

b)      Approving eligible providers of youth services;

c)      Coordinating youth workforce development activities;

d)      Overseeing public relations about youth programs.

 

The Partners’ Roundtable responsibilities include:

a) Focusing on services to customers that would reduce duplication and save                   money that could be reinvested into the system;

b)      Identifying and implementing “best practice” customer service strategies to universal population;

c)      Overseeing public relations for the partners;

d)      Annually negotiating and preparing the MOU and cost allocation plan among the partners.

 

The important factors in our current board member recruitment efforts are relationship to the Strategic Plan, and geography.  Our recently developed strategic plan outlines four key industry clusters.  We are trying to make sure that all four clusters are adequately represented.  We would also like to add one or two Young Professionals to our board.  The other key area is geography.  Although most current businesses (and board members) are based near the cities of Fulton and Oswego, we try to maintain a geographic balance throughout the entire county.  Our CLEO supports this approach.

 

 

Oswego County negotiates an annual contract with the Workforce Development Board (WDB).  The WDB contracts with SUNY Oswego to provide staff to the local board.  Staff development occurs by participating in various State (NYSDOL, NYATEP) and national (NAWB) conference and workshops.


3.      Fiscal Agent and Grant Subrecipient

The Local Plan must identify the fiscal agent or entity responsible for the disbursal of grant funds.

 

Complete Attachment F, Fiscal Agent/Grant Subrecipient, located in Section IV, Required Certifications and Documents, identifying the local Fiscal Agent and the local Grant Subrecipient (if any) who assist in the administration of grant funds. 

 

Also note Attachment D, Signature of Chief Elected Official, requires an attestation that the grant recipient possesses the capacity to fulfill all responsibilities regarding liabilities for funds received, as stipulated in §667.705 of the rules and regulations.

 

4.      Direct Services & Infrastructure Plan

Complete the following tables displaying how core and intensive services will be delivered and funded by the partners within the One Stop centers and affiliate sites identified in the “Profile”.  These tables should aggregate WIA Title1-B and Wagner-Peyser staffing and infrastructure costs, at a minimum.

 

NOTE:  Wagner-Peyser staff do not distinguish between Core and Intensive services.  Therefore, the Wagner-Peyser numbers are reflected in the Core Services Column.

 

Infrastructure Costs in Dollars (Current)

 

One Stop Center and Affiliate Sites

(Identify by Location)

 

 

Rent

 

 

Utilities

 

 

Maintenance

 

 

Technology

 

 

Marketing

 

 

Other

 

 

Total

Fulton

25,968

2,448

5,617

25,000

9,500

 

 

Mexico

13,296

2,448

328

5,000

 

 

 

 

Total Infrastructure Cost and Staff Levels in FTEs (Current)

 

One Stop Center and Affiliate Sites

(Identify by Location)

 

 

Total Cost

Dedicated to Core Services

Dedicated to Intensive Services

Wagner-Peyser Staff

WIA

Title 1-B

Staff

 

(JOBS)

Other

Wagner-

Peyser

Staff

WIA

Title 1-B

Staff

 

 

Other

Fulton

 

3

2.25

1

0

2.25

0

Mexico

 

0

.5

1

0

.5

0

 

Infrastructure Costs In Dollars (Planned over next three years)

 

One Stop Center and Affiliate Sites

(Identify by Location)

 

 

Rent

 

 

Utilities

 

 

Maintenance

 

 

Technology

 

 

Marketing

 

 

Other

 

 

Total

Fulton

77,904

7,344

17,500

75,000

28,500

 

 

Mexico

39,888

7,344

1,200

15,000

 

 

 

Total Infrastructure Cost & Staffing Levels in FTEs (Planned Over Next Three Years)

 

One Stop Center and Affiliate Sites

(Identify by Location)

 

 

Total Cost

Dedicated to Core Services

Dedicated to Intensive Services

Wagner-Peyser Staff

WIA

Title 1-B

Staff

 

 

Other

Wagner-

Peyser

Staff

WIA

Title 1-B

Staff

 

 

Other

Fulton

 

3

2.25

2

0

2.25

0

Mexico

 

.5

0

2

0

.5

0

 

 

Management & Administrative Staffing Across All One Stop Centers and Affiliate Sites

 

 

Total FTEs

Planned

Wagner-Peyser Management Staff For Delivery of Core and Intensive Services

 

.5

.5

Total WIA Title 1 Management & Administrative Staff

 

.5

.5

Total for the LWIA

 

1

1

·         Discuss how the Board or one of its subcommittees anticipates further coordination of services and elimination of duplication in service delivery to maximize resources available to support training and other business services.  

·         WIA Regulation Section 652.202 requires all Wagner-Peyser services to be delivered through the One Stop delivery system, through One Stop centers or affiliate sites.  If Wagner-Peyser services are currently delivered outside either of these means in the LWIA, the Board must identify strategies which will bring the LWIA into compliance with the regulations.

 

The Partners Roundtable is a subcommittee of the local board.  A goal of the Partners Roundtable is coordinating services and eliminating duplication in service delivery.  The Partners participated in a facilitated session earlier this year to identify system goals, and ways to better coordinate service delivery and streamline services.  The goals developed generally fell into the categories of System Building, Partnering/Collaboration, Marketing/Promotions, Technology, Training and Customer Service.  The partners identified some items that were immediately actionable for better coordination and streamlining of services (e.g. disseminating the existing workshop schedule to all partners so customers could be referred, eliminating the need for duplicative workshops).  Other areas were also identified which required further discussion at the Partners table (e.g. maintaining one universal job bank and ensuring systems are in place so all partners enter job orders here).  The Partners are continuing to develop strategies to collaborate and expand on the services available to job seeker and business customers.   Expanding the workshops available to customers, sharing space, dedicating staff to resource room functions, expanding OSOS to capture and report on all system services and activities, and sharing in facilitation are some of the issues being discussed.

 

Wagner-Peyser services are currently being delivered through the One Stop system, although Wagner-Peyser staff are not currently in the centers.  The One Stop Centers provide business and job-seeker access to labor market information.  In addition, the centers provide businesses with the opportunity to post job openings and to conduct on-site recruitments.   Job Seekers are provided information, access and referral to jobs posted in the job bank.   More comprehensive Wagner-Peyser Services (UI customer Orientation/Reemployment process, Job Bank Administration including the talent bank match, Business Services) are currently delivered through the Department of Labor Division of Employment Services.  Plans are currently underway to transition the Wagner-Peyser staff from the Division of Employment Services to the Fulton One-Stop Center, and offer these services through the One Stop center.  A draft floor plan and estimate of costs has been sent to the state for review.  We expect this transition to occur by the 2nd quarter of PY’05.

Subsection 2

Based on the maturity of each local system and the key workforce issues and goals identified through the strategic planning process, address the following points within your response:

1.      Selecting and Certifying Operators

The Local Board is responsible for selecting and certifying the One Stop Operator with the agreement of the chief elected official [§662.410].  In addition, it is the Board’s responsibility to hold Operators accountable for specific goals and evaluate performance against those goals throughout the period of certification or recertification. All LWIAs must submit their recertification application no later than June 30, 2005 or the local plan will be deemed incomplete.  The One Stop Operator recertification process is a required part of the local plan.  However, local plan approval is not contingent upon approval of the One Stop Operator recertification application. 

The local plan will need to be modified if the recertification application is not approved prior to local plan approval. 

 

Complete Attachment G, One Stop Operator Information, in Section IV, Required Certifications and Documents.  Also attach a copy of the local area’s One Stop Operator Agreement. 

 

2.      Contracting for Service Providers

The Workforce Investment Act permits WIA Title I services to be provided through contracts with service providers and may include contracts with public, private for-profit and nonprofit service providers as approved by the Local Board.  For those local areas that contract for services:

 

·         How does the Local Board determine which WIA Title 1 services, if any, should be contracted out?  Explain how your decision leverages funding and services already provided by One Stop system partner staff (e.g., Wagner-Peyser funded staff) to maximize available resources without duplication of services.

·         Provide the process by which the Board awards contracts to entities other than the One Stop Operator for the provision of One Stop services.  Identify any subcommittee responsible for this function.   How often is the need for contracting services reviewed? 

·         For which services do you currently contract?

·         Based on current and future key workforce issues and goals, what changes does the Board anticipate with regard to the number and type of services for which it will be contracting?

 

Adult and Dislocated Worker Services are not contracted out.  Youth contracting is covered in Section 7 – Youth Services.

 

3.            Priority of Service

The Local Plan must describe the criteria used to determine whether funds allocated for employment and training activities are limited, and the process by which any priority of service will be applied [§663.600 - §663.640]. 

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to priority of service. 

·         What is the Board’s policy for determining priority of service and its relationship to residency requirements?  How often is the policy revisited?

·         How will the priority of service plan align with planned operating policies and procedures?

 

The Executive committee of the local board is the committee responsible for policy related to priority of service.  The need for priority of service is based on the availability of adequate funding to meet the local employment needs.  The local Board has established a residency policy for training services.  Priority is given to residents of Oswego County or individuals who have been dislocated from an Oswego County employer. 

 

The priority of service plan is aligned with operating procedures as Oswego County is experienced in applying multiple funding streams in order to maximize the training opportunities for our customers.  Each customer’s circumstances (income, employment history, barriers that impede employment, etc.) are reviewed and a funding plan established to meet these needs.  Currently, there is not a need to establish target group priorities, as adequate funding is available through the multiple streams (e.g. WIA, TANF, Trade Act).  Should funding be limited, the board policy establishes public assistance recipients and other low-income individuals as its priority. 

 

4.            Self-Sufficiency

Local Boards must set criteria for determining whether employment leads to self-sufficiency [§663.230].

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to self-sufficiency.

·         Provide the current definition of self-sufficiency as established by the Local Board. 

·         Describe how the local definition of self-sufficiency will align with the strategic objectives set forth in the strategic planning portion of this plan.

 

The Executive Committee of the local board is the committee responsible for policies relating to self-sufficiency.  The local boards current definition of self-sufficiency is:

 

An employed individual with an hourly wage that is greater than $25 per hour.  (Revised 3/23/06)

 

An employed individual with an hourly wage that is greater than $18 per hour. 

 

However, the board identified the need for an exemption to the self-sufficient wage.  Experience showed that many local businesses have a need for customized training for their employees in order to remain competitive in their respective industries.  The board exemption states:  “In cases where a business (or group of businesses) engage in a customized training program, participant workers must be assessed to determine their need for training services.  Workers who have been assessed to need the services will not be subject to the wage limitations noted in the self-sufficiency definition for the purposes of customized training only.”

 

The local definition of self-sufficiency aligns with the strategic plan through ongoing evaluation of local needs.  Changes to this definition are recommended and reviewed by the board in response to the needs in the local labor market.

 

5.      Supportive Services and Needs-Related Payments

Local Boards, in consultation with One Stop partners and other community service providers, must develop a policy on supportive services that ensures resource and service coordination in the local area.  The policy should address procedures for referrals to such services, including how such services will be funded when they are not otherwise available from other sources.  Local Boards may establish limits on the provision of supportive services or provide the One Stop Operator with the authority to establish such limits.  Consistent with other regulations, the Local Board must establish the level of needs-related payments for adults [§663.800].

 

·        Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to supportive services and needs-related payments. 

·         Describe the process for the periodic review and update of supportive service policies.  How often is this review done and who conducts the review?  If a multi-county area, how will supportive service policies coordinated among the counties?

·         Does the local area make needs-related payments and if so, how and how often is the policy or payment level reviewed?

 

The Executive Committee of the Oswego County Workforce Development Board is responsible for reviewing policies related to Supportive Services and Needs Related Payments.

 

Periodic review of policies related to supportive services is conducted on an as-needed basis.  The recommendation to review such policies usually comes from front line staff who work directly with customers and who have a feel for what customers need.  Agency funding status may also have an impact on how often such policies are reviewed.  For example, when the agency has fewer available funds, supportive service policies might be reviewed in order to free up additional dollars for training.  The reverse would also be true: when funds are plentiful, we might review the policy(s) in order to make them less restrictive and easier for customers to access.

 

Review of such policies and the recommendation for review is the responsibility of the senior team in the One Stop setting.

 

Yes, Oswego County does provide for needs-related payments.  As with supportive services policies, these guidelines are reviewed on an as-needed basis using customer needs and agency funding as guidelines.

6.      Grievances and Complaints

The Local Board must establish and maintain a procedure for grievances and complaints which provides a process for handling complaints, an opportunity for informal resolution or a hearing, a process that allows a labor standards grievance to be submitted for binding arbitration, and an opportunity for local level appeal to the state [§667.600].  Such procedure must be in compliance with applicable federal and state statutes and regulations available at http://www.dol.gov/oasam/programs/crc/crcwelcome.htm and Workforce Development System Technical Advisories #02-6, #02-7 and #02-10.  Section D, Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Assurance, in Attachment H, Federal and State Certifications, requires the local signatories to attest to compliance with these provisions.

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to grievances and complaints. 

·         What is the Board’s process for collecting, analyzing and utilizing grievance and complaint information?  How often is the information analyzed and who is responsible for the analysis?

     Identify any subcommittee responsible for this function. 

·         Has the analysis of the data regarding complaints resulted in policy changes in the local area?  How were those changes communicated to the public, the staff and the State?

 

The Executive Committee is the committee of the local board responsible for policies related to grievances and complaints.

 

A formal grievance and complaint procedure has been established for the One Stop system.  Customers accessing services are made aware of the grievance and complaint procedures, as they are oriented to the center.  The application process includes a sign-off by the customer that they are made aware the procedure exists, and provided the opportunity to request a copy.   A copy of the grievance and complaint procedures are also attached to all contracts for services.

 

In addition to the information provided at orientation and included in contracts, a contact name and phone number for grievances and complaints is posted at the centers.  Should a grievance or complaint be filed, this information would be recorded by the complaint/grievance resolution officer.  The information on the grievance or complaint, and how it is being addressed, would be and shared with the Executive Committee at the quarterly meetings.  Grievances and complaints (and how they are addressed) are also tracked on a state log and submitted to the state on an annual basis.  The local area has not had any formal grievances or complaints filed.

 

 

It has been the State’s experience that complaints may include information that is not grievable but rather is related to the business practices of the One Stop centers such as staff capacity, quality of information exchanges, process flow (e.g., provision of outdated grievance contact information, packets of information duplicated so often as to be unreadable, staff providing limited explanations of policies and procedures or not providing copies of Individual Employment Plans).

 

·         By what means is information regarding non-grievable complaints shared with the One Stop Operator?  How is this information used to support the continuous improvement of the One Stop system of service delivery?

 

Information on non-grievable complaints are shared with the One Stop Operator in a variety of ways.  The Operator meets with supervisory staff from the centers on a monthly basis.  Customer service issues are discussed at this meeting.  The Operator also receives the notes from weekly staff meetings that address customer issues.  In addition, Customer comment cards are made available in the centers.  The comment cards are collected, and data from the comment cards is compiled.  A report is then issued from the Operator to the partner agencies and the Evaluation & Franchise committee; a subcommittee of the local board.   The information from the customer comment cards is also reported to the Evaluation and Franchise committee at quarterly meetings along with any corrective action taken to address concerns raised.  Customers also have the option of contacting the Operator directly to discuss non-grievable complaints.   Non-grievable complaints warranting policy changes would be brought back to the Board for discussion.

 

7.      Youth Services

Service Levels

 

For the past four Program Years, record the number of older youth and younger youth served by your LWIA and the planned service levels for PY 05.

 

 

 

PY 01

 

PY 02

 

PY 03

 

PY 04

PY 05

Planned

Older Youth

71

58

27

20

50

Younger Youth

176

209

195

153

195

 

Note:  The total number of youth served is found in the WIA Annual Reports.

 

WIA PY04 data may be found through the most recent WIA Quarterly Report.

 

Performance

 

Based on the exit data of the last four years, provide a summary of the local area’s performance with respect to the required WIA measures.  For each program year, enter the standard, outcome and indicate Pass/Fail of the performance using “P” or “F” as indicators.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Measure

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funding

PY 2001

PY 2002

PY 2003

Standard

Outcome

Pass/Fail

80% of

Standard

Standard

Outcome

Pass/Fail

80% of

Standard

Standard

Outcome

Pass/Fail

80% of

Standard

Entered Employment Rate

Older Youth

81.0

88.0

P

82.0

72.0

P

80.0

70.0

P

 

 

Retention Rate

Older Youth

75.0

70.8

F

74.0

95.5

P

78.0

95.8

P

Younger Youth

41.0

50.0

P

42.0

61.9

P

47.0

65.5

P

Earnings Change

Older Youth

$2,871

$1,611

F

$2,815

$5,815

P

$2,850

$4,214

P

Credential Attainment Rate

Older Youth

56.0

33.3

F

59.0

43.3

F

55.0

55.6

P

Diploma/GED Rate

Younger Youth

47.0

63.2

P

54.0

54.5

P

52.0

82.8

P

Skill Attainment Rate

Younger Youth

67.0

82.6

P

69.0

84.2

P

70.0

91.5

P

 

Based on your performance answer the following:

 

·         If the LWIA has failed any of the performance measures in the past, what actions has the Board taken with its youth providers to identify service delivery weaknesses? 

·         What changes have been made to policy, service delivery, providers, engagement of partners, memberships on board and councils, etc., to provide for improved program performance?

·         How have those changes been incorporated or aligned with key workforce challenges and planning strategies?

·         What strategies are being devised to exceed standards, improve services and increase market penetration?

 

Two Older Youth measures were failed in PY 01 and one in PY 02.  The Board worked with the LWIA to identify the problem.  The failures in PY 01 were attributed to some youth being carried in from the previous program that had different goals and expectations.  There were also some errors in data transition going from Revelations to the One Stop Operating System.  Action to correct the one failure in PY 02 was taken including attention to data collection and entry.

 

Staff dedicated to Youth programs have been trained on data collection and proper recording in the OSOS.  Youth staff meets formally at least twice each month to discuss program issues.  In addition to those meetings, information is exchanged informally on a daily basis.  Efforts were made to increase contact with local schools and that has resulted in cooperative alliances with most of the nine school districts in the area and a better exchange of information.  Linkages were established with specialized service providers in order to meet the needs of customers.   

 

Plans for corrective action (and the resulting performance from previous corrective action) are routinely reviewed by the Workforce Development Board.  Youth staff assist their customers in accessing services they need that are in line with enhancing program performance. 

 

Career Connection staff maintain accurate records of accomplishments and see that they are recorded correctly.  A team dedicated to youth services has been established.  They have increased the opportunities for youth to obtain credentials and increased market penetration through contacts in the school system, participating in job fairs and career fairs and through community outreach.   

 

The Career Connection staff have presented workshops on labor market issues to youth where local employers are featured.  Incentives are used to encourage youth to participate, retain their interest in the program, improve school performance, and increase job retention.  Monthly newsletters and workshop flyers improve the communication link with customers and agencies.    

 

 

Framework and Program Elements

 

The Workforce Investment Act requires that the Local Plan define the design framework for youth programs in the local area and define how the ten program elements are provided within that framework.  With regard to the design framework and program elements, the following questions should be addressed:

 

·         Describe the Board’s process and frequency for reviewing the design framework and how it evaluates whether the framework is equipped to successfully support emerging trends, current and future workforce goals and workforce strategies as they relate to youth.

·         If a multi-county area, describe how youth program design is coordinated among the counties.

·         Describe the type and availability of youth activities in the local area and identify any challenges for serving greater numbers of youth most-in-need, including out-of-school youth. 

·         What efforts, if any, are being made to connect both WIA and non-WIA youth to the One Stop system?  How are youth being exposed to career awareness, work readiness and the One Stop system?

·         Describe how the Youth Council will incorporate literacy and numeracy elements into the design framework in accordance with USDOL Common Measures Policy.

·         Describe how the Youth Council will incorporate certificates into the design framework in accordance with USDOL Common Measures Policy.

 

The Youth Council meets quarterly.  The Workforce Development Board identifies trends and develops workforce strategies with the appropriate committees of the board.  The

agenda is set by the committee chair and the Workforce Development Board as it relates to the work of the full board.  The Youth Council reviews current WIA performance outcomes at each meeting.  Youth participate in the Youth Council and the meetings.  The Workforce Development Board has identified four occupational clusters deemed to be important to the future of this county and this information has been shared with the Youth Council. 

 

Youth activities that are available in the area include: job preparedness skills, intern/job coaching and work ethic development, supported work, independent life skill development, leadership, and education-based services.  Youth who are enrolled in some of these services must meet eligibility criteria.

 

A major challenge lies in transportation.  This is a rural area with little public transportation.  Each of the two cities has bus routes that make limited runs during the day.  Some of the remote areas are linked to the city routes.  This system doesn’t help youth who need to travel evenings or who live several miles from the routes.

 

Outreach to youth, especially the hard-to-serve population, is also a challenge to serving youth.  Many youth in need are not aware of the services (including employment) that are available to them, or how to access these services.

 

Staff participate in events where the audience is made up of WIA and non-WIA youth.  Participants at these events are encouraged to visit the One Stop for direct services and to access the services they need.  An Open House was held where WIA youth were invited to “bring-a-friend”.  Staff distribute Labor Market Information and describe the services of the One Stop system.  Events include: the State University of New York at Oswego’s Career Night, Career Day for high school students, mock interviews for junior high students, and presentations to school personnel and social services staff.  Furthermore, staff present to youth who participate in the TANF 200% summer program. 

 

The Youth Council will host a Youth Summit in October 2005 for both WIA and non-WIA youth.  Several youth are helping plan this event, which is designed to attract youth from throughout Oswego County.  Several topic areas of interest to youth will be covered including interviewing skills, getting and keeping a job, and employer expectations.  Local businesses will also be involved in this summit.

 

The Youth Council addressed the issue of these elements by contracting with a partner agency.  Oswego County BOCES accepts referrals to do the pre-testing, remediation, and post-testing of WIA youth.

 

The Youth Council lays out the parameters for awarding certificates.  As certificates for secondary students will be included in performance outcomes, program design will be changed to accommodate the common measures.  Through the release of information process, it is often possible to obtain records from local schools.  These efforts will be expanded to formalize and expand the process to include all local training providers.  Long-term program retention will continue to be emphasized. 

 

 

Youth Council

 

WIA requires that a Youth Council be established as a subgroup of the Local Board [§661.335].

 

·         Describe the current and future goals of the Youth Council as aligned with the overall strategic goals of the local area.

·         What outreach and connections to other youth services and providers will be collaboratively planned (i.e., Youth Bureaus, educational partners) to ensure the provision of integrated youth services?

 

The Workforce Development Board has determined four career clusters that are expected to show growth in the area: Energy, Health, Hospitality, and Manufacturing.  The Workforce Development Board has worked with futurists and economists to identify elements necessary to attract and retain young workers in this area. 

 

The Youth Council is planning a Youth Summit for PY 05.  Members from the Youth Council are working together to identify which community groups, agencies, and youth representatives should be involved.  As part of that process, new needs and opportunities for integrated services are expected to occur and will be acted upon.  Staffings and meetings are currently held periodically with youth service providers.  These efforts will be continued.

 

The Coordinator of Employment Services meets every other week with other county departments that serve youth (Social Services, Mental Health, Youth Bureau, Public Health) to discuss issues of common interest, and to integrate planning for services based on local needs.  Staffings and meetings are also held with other youth service providers.  These efforts will be continued.

 

 

Selecting Youth Providers

 

The Local Board is responsible for selecting eligible youth service providers based on recommendations of the Youth Council, and maintaining a list of providers with performance and cost information [§661.305].

 

·         Identify your youth providers, the services they provide and the steps that will be taken to leverage additional resources to deliver integrated youth services in a broader youth development context.

·         Has your partner or vendor mix also changed and if so, how and why?  Describe how this mix provides integrated youth services from a youth development perspective. 

·         Describe your Youth RFP process including the frequency of release,  review criteria and who reviews the proposals

·         For which services has the Board entered into a contract?  Are the local Employment and Training offices providing any services to youth?

 

BOCES offers educational opportunities, and testing and remediation with regard to the common measures.  Cayuga County Community College offers post-secondary educational opportunities.  Career Employment Services offers job coaching, career exploration, labor market information, and counseling.  Oswego County Opportunities offers counseling, work experience, and tutoring.  The Youth Advocacy Program offers intensive counseling and work readiness training.  The Youth Bureau offers a Leadership Oswego County program targeted towards youth.

 

The chair of the Youth Council is the Director of the Youth Bureau.  Several partners and service providers meet through the Youth Council and sub-committees to coordinate service delivery.  Staff who work primarily with WIA youth meet bi-weekly for case management.  Partner representatives can attend to share information and plan enhancements to service delivery.

 

The Youth RFP process occurs every two years.  The Youth Team from Employment & Training reviews the proposals, evaluates the proposals, and summarizes them before sending them to the Youth Council.  Criteria for review includes: completeness of required information (program description, budget information, target population, etc); documentation of the provider’s applicable experience; applicability to the 10 program elements or basic skills deficiency; timeliness, cost effectiveness; and success rate and experience of the provider. 

 

Contracts are in place for vocational training, counseling, job coaching, testing, leadership, and tutoring.  The Employment and Training office provides assessment, case management, comprehensive guidance and counseling, work experience, workshops, and summer employment opportunities.

 

Youth Eligibility

 

Regulations require that, as part of the process for determining who is eligible for youth services, the Local Board must provide a definition of “deficient in basic literacy skills” and “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to hold and secure employment” [§664.205, §664.210].

 

·         Provide current definitions and describe how these definitions will support the goals the Board has identified in addressing its key workforce issues and what effect they have on eligibility for youth services.

 

To be considered basic skills deficient, the youth must score below the 8.9 level in reading or math or have not completed high school or attained a General Equivalency Diploma (GED).  Services are designed to help youth raise their literacy rates in order for them to enjoy success in their futures.  The four occupational clusters that the Workforce Development Board identified require competitive employment practices.

 

8.      WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker and Wagner-Peyser Services

Service Levels

 

Record the number of WIA Adults, WIA Dislocated Workers and Wagner-Peyser customers served by your LWIA and the planned service levels for PY05.

 

 

Total Number Served

 

PY 01

 

PY 02

 

PY 03

 

PY 04

PY 05

Planned

WIA Adults

219

289

538

229

280

 WIA Dislocated Workers

230

246

276

178

290

Wagner-Peyser Funded Customers*

NA

6,499

4,887

3,414

4,405

 

Note:   The total numbers served for WIA Title IB is found in the WIA Annual Reports.

 

         PY04 WIA Title IB data is found through the most recent WIA Quarterly Report.

 

*Please consult with the Wagner-Peyser LWIB member for assistance in obtaining and understanding Wagner-Peyser numbers. 

 

Performance

 

Based on the exit data, provide a summary of the local area’s performance with respect to the required WIA measures.  For each program year, enter the standard, outcome and indicate Pass/Fail of the performance using “P” or “F” as indicators.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Measure

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funding

PY 2001

PY 2002

PY 2003

Standard

Outcome

Pass/Fail

80% of

Standard

Standard

Outcome

Pass/Fail

80% of

Standard

Standard

Outcome

Pass/Fail

80% of

Standard

Customer Satisfaction

Participants

70.0

NA

NA

72

NA

P

68.0

70.4

P

Employers

68.0

77.0

P

70.0

NA

P

71.0

86.7

P

Entered Employment Rate

Adults

82.0

80.0

P

83.0

89.5

P

83.0

90.6

P

Dislocated Workers

84.0

96.0

P

85.0

94.1

P

85.0

90.7

P

Retention Rate

Adults

68.0

84.6

P

70.0

90.3

P

79.0

91.0

P

Dislocated Workers

79.0

95.8

P

77.0

95.5

P

87.0

96.5

P

Earnings Change

Adults

$3,496

$4,248

P

$3,428

$5,138

P

$3,428

$4,059

P

Earnings Replacement Rate

Dislocated Workers

93.0

123.5

P

93.0

96.7

P

92.0

94.8

P

Credential Attainment Rate

Adults

62.0

80.8

P

74.0

81.3

P

76.0

78.4

P

Dislocated Workers

49.0

73.3

P

59.0

87.2

P

60.0

81.4

P

Job Seeker Entered Employment Rate

Wagner-Peyser

N/A

N/A

     

     

     

Job Seeker Employment Retention Rate

Wagner- Peyser

N/A

N/A

     

     

     

 

Based on your performance answer the following:

 

·         If you have failed any of the performance measures in the past, what actions has the Board taken with its program operators and One Stop operator to identify service delivery weaknesses?

·          What changes will be made to policy, service delivery, training providers, engagement of partners, memberships on board and councils, etc., to achieve all performance standards?

·         What strategies are being devised to exceed met standards, improve services and increase market penetration?

 

The One Stop Career Connection has not failed any of the Adult and Dislocated Worker performance measures in the past.  The One Stop Career Connection makes use of continuous improvement practices for its operation and programs.  Strategies are initiated by staff; based on business and job seeker customer feedback; direction from the Workforce Development Board; and directives from the NYS DOL.  Strategies being discussed for implementation in the next three years include: increasing job seeker registrations particularly among the TANF population, working more closely with partner agencies for customers-in-common, and making the employer screens in OSOS accessible to One Stop staff.

 

Adult and Dislocated Worker Eligibility

 

WIA regulations set forth the eligibility criteria that adults and dislocated workers must meet to participate in WIA Title I and Wager-Peyser programs.  In addition, Local Boards are given responsibility to further establish policies and procedures for One Stop Operators to use in determining an individual’s eligibility as a dislocated worker, including the definition of what constitutes a “general announcement” of a plant closing and, for determining eligibility of self-employed individuals, what constitutes “unemployed as a result of general economic conditions in the community in which the individual resides because of natural disasters” [§663.115].

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to adult and dislocated worker eligibility. 

·         How is the definition of a “general announcement” of a plant closing shared with staff to determine dislocated worker eligibility (including partner staff needing to determine dislocated worker “target group” eligibility for Work Opportunity Tax Credit applications)?

·         Describe how the One Stop Operator’s policies and procedures adequately address the needs of self employed individuals who become unemployed as a result of general economic conditions in their community because of natural disasters.

·         Describe how reemployment services for UI customers are coordinated in your One Stop system.  Explain how UI profiling information will be used to target services, including enrollment into the dislocated worker program.  

 

The Skills and Training Committee of the Workforce Development Board is responsible for reviewing policies related to adult and dislocated worker eligibility.

 

General announcements of plant closings are shared with staff through e-mail and staff meetings.  The local Department of Labor is notified by e-mail or telephone calls.  Typically, Rapid Response sessions are coordinated by the Regional Department of Labor office; they take the lead in disseminating relevant information to partners.

 

Working with individuals unemployed as a result of a natural disaster is not a situation that we have faced in the past.  However, Oswego County would work with self-employed individuals who are unemployed because of general economic conditions as we would any dislocated worker or adult customer.  They would be provided with employment related counseling and an assessment of their skills and work history.  We would work with them to meet their needs related to a job search for immediate employment or training to enhance their employability.

 

Oswego County is looking forward to the relocation of the local Department of Labor into the Career Connection Center within the next few months.  When this relocation of staff occurs, RSO sessions will be held on-site in the Center.  Based on staffing sessions with local DOL and WIA staff, decisions will be made on which customers should be enrolled into the dislocated worker program.

 

 

Rapid Response

 

Provide a description of the Local Board strategies to integrate strategies into the One Stop system.

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to Rapid Response.

·         What policies can the Local Board enact to foster greater connections with the One Stop system and better outcomes for individuals served through local Rapid Response activities?  

·         Who is responsible for coordinating Rapid Response services in the local One Stop system?

·         Describe how Rapid Response functions as a business service in your local area.  How will Rapid Response promote the full range of services available to help companies in all stages of the economic cycle, not just those available during layoffs? 

 

The Executive Committee and Business Development Committee are the subcommittees of the Workforce Development Board responsible for policies related to Rapid Response.

 

Regional Department of Labor takes the lead in coordinating Rapid Response sessions, bringing in those agencies that will be involved in the sessions.  They also share information received from the impacted employers with those involved with Rapid Response.  The relocation of local Department of Labor into the Career Connection Center will enhance the delivery of services to impacted workers.  The development of common policies relating to customer flow and service delivery will foster greater connections with the system and better outcomes for the individuals served.  

 

Rapid Response services are coordinated by the Regional Department of Labor.  Delivery of customer services, beyond the actual Rapid Response sessions, are coordinated by the One Stop Operator and One Stop Center staff.

 

Oswego County has a Business Services team that is made up of representatives of partner agencies.  This team meets on a regular basis and works with employers to provide a full range of business services.  Included in these services are both On-the-Job training and customized training services.  Customized services are made available to employers to help them stay current with their competitors.  Business Services team members are also aware of grant opportunities and share this information with businesses.

 

 

Business Services

 

Provide a description of the Local Board’s strategies to improve services to employers.

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to Business Services.

·         What is the plan to:

o        determine the needs of employers in your local area?

o        integrate business services, including Wagner-Peyser Act services, to employers through the One Stop system?

o        maximize awareness and employer use of available Federal tax credit programs through the system?

 

The Executive Committee and Business Development Committees of the local board are responsible for policies related to Business Services.

 

The Business Development committee was established in October 2002 in response to the needs identified through the Workforce Development Board’s assessment process.   Members of this group include: private employers, community based organizations, and county and state agencies.  A separate workgroup dedicated to business services has been formed from this committee.  The workgroup is represented by: Cayuga County Community College, New York State Department of Labor, Oswego County Board of Cooperative Education, Oswego County Division of Employment & Training, Oswego County Department of Social Services, Oswego County Opportunities, Oswego Industries Career Employment Services, and New York State Vocational and Educations Services to Individuals with Disabilities.

 

The One Stop’s business service representatives make direct contact with employers by following up with existing employers, approaching new businesses and responding to inquiries.  They share information freely among themselves and as a group at the monthly meetings.  A new survey tool has been developed for use beginning June 2005.  The purpose is to gather feedback on local employer needs so that services are available to address those needs.  Other methods of accessing information from the business customer include: following up on leads from the Workforce Development Board and Economic Development, and informal feedback from employers and job seekers.  The One Stop will enhance and expand services for the business customer.  

 

The Business Services workgroup meets monthly.  The members share information about their work.  The source of the information may be from the business service representatives’ own caseloads, the Department of Labor Job Service Employer Committee (JSEC), and economic development.  This supplements the ongoing process among individual workgroup members to coordinate business services as needed pending the requests of the employer community.  The plan is to continue this practice.  This workgroup has developed and distributed business services marketing materials.  Business representatives from the Career Connection Center have partnered with representatives from the NYS DOL to jointly approach employers.  In addition, the business representatives from the partner agencies are jointly developing a process to conduct on-site employer recruitments and share information about the recruitments among the partner agencies.

 

 

When calling on businesses, business service representatives talk about tax incentives.  Materials on tax incentives are included in the marketing materials. 

 

 

Coordination and Integration of Services

 

Provide a description of how the Local Board fosters coordination and integration of One Stop services.

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to Coordination and Integration of services.

·         Provide a brief explanation on how core, intensive and training services are delivered.  Specifically discuss how Wagner-Peyser funded core services are coordinated with WIA Title 1B funded core services.  Describe how you assure that the delivery of these services is aligned. Identify any subcommittee responsible for this function.   

·         How will coordination of services provided by each of the required and optional One Stop partners through the One Stop system be improved? 

·         How will freed-up resources resulting from this improved coordination and integration of services be utilized to provide expanded training opportunities?

·         Describe the level of coordination with Wagner-Peyser in your full-service One Stop centers.  In consultation with the local Wagner-Peyser WIB representative, describe what steps toward full integration are planned over the next three years.

 

The coordination and integration of services within the One Stop is overseen by the Partners Roundtable; a committee of the Workforce Development Board.

 

Currently, job seeker customer services are provided in 2 One Stop locations, and in the DOL Division of Employment Services office.  Wagner-Peyser core services (e.g. labor market information and the provision of job referrals) are provided in all 3 locations.  In the One Stop career centers, services are provided by WIA staff members.  Wagner-Peyser services are provided by DOL staff in the Division of Employment Services office.  Basic WIA core services are also available in the Division of Employment Services office; for WIA staff assisted core and intensive services; customers are referred to the One Stop locations.

 

Coordination of services is a high priority for the One Stop system in Oswego County.  The WDB has a franchising process that incorporates the One Stop Operator, the One Stop centers and partner sites that wish to have affiliate status.  The process strives for on-going quality improvement throughout the system. 

 

The Partners Roundtable, a committee of the WDB, meets quarterly to discuss issues of concern to the partners.  Through this discussion process, problems are identified and decisions are made on how the system can be improved.  For a long period of time, the MOU/CAP process became the focus of meetings and how to get this document in place.  A conscious effort is being made to redirect our efforts to focus on working together to improve customer services. 

 

Finally, partners within the system have the opportunity to send staff to training on issues that impact the system and its services.  Shared training provides for common goals in the work that we do with both business and job seeker customers.

 

We do not anticipate any cost savings as a result of the coordination of services.  We currently work together with our partners and simply seek to enhance and improve services to our customers.

 

Wagner-Peyser Job Bank and Job Referral services in the One Stop centers are currently provided by WIA staff.  We anticipate that the staff from the local Department of Labor will be relocating into the One Stop by the fall of 2005.  Talks are already underway on how services will be integrated and responsibilities will be shared by staff members.  Some examples of coordination that will occur over the next three years include sharing resource room coverage responsibilities, providing One Stop staff with the ability to post jobs in the job bank, coordinating contacts with business customers, and developing joint processes for hosting on-site employer recruitments.  Work has already started in these areas. Some examples of areas of coordination between all partners include enhanced use of one universal job bank by all partner agencies (for job seeker use and job posting), coordination of a system wide workshop schedule (workshops to be facilitated by various partner agencies and offered in the One Stop Center and at affiliate sites); expansion of technology systems (e.g. Swipe Card, OSOS) to partner sites; and the development of a joint process for marketing and promoting the One Stop system.

 

Service to Special Populations

 

Provide a description of the Local Board’s strategies for serving Special Populations.

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to Service to Special Populations.

·         Describe the Board’s strategies for anticipated enhancements to service delivery for special populations, including at a minimum Unemployment Insurance claimants, veterans, displaced homemakers, individuals with disabilities, individuals with limited English proficiency, older individuals, and migrant and seasonal farm workers over the next three years.

 

Policies relating to the services provided to special populations are overseen by the members of the Partners’ Roundtable.

 

The Oswego County One Stop system currently serves members of special populations as identified above. 

 

Unemployment claimants are able to use Center telephones to make their UIB contacts and basic written information is available to them at the Center.  Referrals are made to the local DOL when appropriate.

 

For veterans, the DOL Veterans’ representative will be located on-site when the DOL relocates into the Career Connection Center.  Currently referrals are made to him as needed.  The county Veteran’s Office is also located on-site.

 

Displaced homemakers are served as any job seeker customer.  Staff members are able to make referrals to various human service organizations as needed if the customer has needs beyond those that we can deal with.   Access to local Department of Social Services programs to meet the basic living needs of this group of customers is also available through the center.

 

For those with disabilities, there is a Disabilities Navigator on-site in the Career Connection Center in Fulton.  She meets monthly with other human service agencies to share information and improve services to customers.  There is a VESID counselor on-site several days a week; she and the DPN confer on the best services for their customers.  Additionally we have an adaptive technology computer system and have a TDY on order.  A staff member has a working familiarity with American Sign Language.

 

Serving individuals with limited English proficiency has not been an issue for us; interpretation services are available if needed.

 

Older individuals are worked with as any adult customer; they are provided the full array of One Stop services.  Additionally, a referral procedure is in place for referring Older Workers to the Experience Works program. 

 

There is a migrant and seasonal farm worker population in Oswego County.  The majority of this population has employment; those who do not receive the majority of their employment services through Rural Migrant programs.  Any individuals who come into the Career Center are served as any adult job seeker.

 

Demand Occupations, Eligible Training Providers (ETP), Individual Training Accounts (ITA)

 

The Local Board has responsibility for determining policies regarding identifying demand occupations, instituting eligible training providers and implementing individual training accounts [§663.300- §663.595]. 

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for determining, evaluating and updating policies related to Demand Occupations, Eligible Training Providers (initial and subsequent eligibility) and Individual Training Accounts.

·         Describe how the local area ensures that local training providers on the State ETP list are licensed, registered and/or approved by the appropriate State or Federal oversight entities (e.g., proprietary schools regulated by the New York State Education Department, Bureau of Proprietary Supervision, under Article 101 of New York State Education Law), and in compliance with the requirements/standards of these entities. 

·         How are cost and performance data being collected and validated for the provider’s offerings and how does it inform the subsequent eligibility review process?  How is customer feedback collected; how frequently is it used; and how is it shared with the public?

·         Based on current and future key workforce issues and goals, what changes are being considered to the demand occupations, eligible training provider and individual training account review process and how will they be implemented?

·         If a multi-county area, how is the review process for demand occupations, eligible training providers and individual training accounts coordinated among the counties?

·         Describe how contiguous areas’ policies affect your process and any coordination efforts at the regional level.

·         How are demand occupations, eligible training providers and individual training account policy decisions and changes communicated to staff?  How are they shared with customers?

 

The Executive Committee and the Skills and Training committee of the local board deal with policy issues relating to demand occupations, eligible training providers and individual training accounts.

 

Providers attest to their certification when applying to be on the eligible training provider list.

 

Performance outcomes of course offerings are compiled and shared with the Skills and Standards committee.  The data is compiled by occupational area, type of training, and funding sources.  It is reported quarterly.  Customer feedback is solicited via surveys that are handed out to the students.  The return rate for this method is low.  Anecdotal feedback is more freely given and captured in the case management system.  This is an area that will get more attention in the next year with the goal of maintaining usable, all-inclusive documentation. 

 

The demand occupation list is under consideration for change with the Skills Standards committee.  The original list that was compiled by the NYS DOL was realigned into the four occupational clusters of the Workforce Development Board and some additional clusters.  The list was examined by One Stop Center staff in the context of potential changes based on local labor market demand.  The eligible training provider list and review is dynamic.  Employment and Training staff present the results of the year’s training activities on a quarterly basis to the Skills Standards committee of the Workforce Development Board. 

 

This is not a multi-county area.

 

The policies and practices of two contiguous areas have some influence on this area.  There is significant outward commutation with the metropolitan area to the south and limited outward commutation to the north.  Training and services reflect some exchange of customers among these areas as well.  There is concern that the information given out to customers who may be affected due to their commute is not contradictory and is correct.  To this end and to provide seamless services to the customers, case managers try to stay in contact with staff from the other areas to exchange information.    

 

Policy decisions and changes are typically shared at staff meetings where there is an opportunity to discuss the content.  Policies are also posted on a website which staff can access.  Staff are instrumental in incorporating policy into practice and relaying policy information to customers.

 

 

Customized Training/On-the-Job Training (OJT)

 

Local Boards are required to establish policy regarding appropriate cost matches for On-the-Job Training (OJT) or other customized training using NYSDOL Technical Advisories #01-5 and #01-5.1 for guidance.

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to Customized Training and OJT.

·         Describe the process and frequency for reviewing local policies with regard to OJT, skills upgrading or other customized training.  Describe the process for receiving, reviewing and approving requests for OJT, skills upgrading or other customized training; who is the point of contact? Identify any subcommittee responsible for this function.   

 

The Skills Standard and Business Development committees of the local board handle issues related to Customized and On-the-Job training.

 

Policies are set by the Workforce Development Board.  The impetus for policy change may be a result of changes in legislation or regulations, interest from a board member, or in response to situations presented by the customers.  When a policy is set, the actual implementation into practice becomes the responsibility of staff. 

 

The point of contact for OJT and Customized Training is the business services representative.  The representative meets with an employer, discusses options, and prepares and presents proposals for funding.  The proposal is examined and put through a two-level approval process.  Pending the outcome of that process, the business representative proceeds with the participant enrollment process. 

 

 

Trade Act Service Strategy

 

Local Boards are required to establish local policy for a Trade Act service strategy and must ensure that a dislocated worker eligible for trade benefits is co-enrolled in WIA Title I dislocated worker services for referral to WIA-funded intensive services and Trade-funded training services [TA #04-6].

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to Trade Act Services.

·         Describe the impact, if any, Trade Act petition certifications have had on your local workforce system and how the Board’s Trade Act policies  will be aligned with the Dislocated Worker policies to benefit the customer in terms of an integrated service delivery model.

·         Describe the process and frequency by which your Trade Act policies are reviewed and the circumstances that would require changes to be made.

 

The Executive Committee of the Workforce Development Board is responsible for local policies related to the Trade Act.

 

Trade Act petition certifications have had a major impact on the local economy due to the closing of several manufacturing facilities.  Trade Act services were incorporated into the One Stop center in July 2004 and a staff person is dedicated to coordinating services for these customers. As much as possible, services for Trade Act customers are directly aligned with those for other adult and dislocated worker customers.  For example, a Trade Act customer may meet with the staff person dedicated to Trade Act for waivers, the development of the employment plan and/or enrollment into WIA and Trade Act services.  However, if that individual is interested in training opportunities he/ she must follow the same process that our general population customers follow.

 

Trade Act policies were developed when the responsibility for that program became the responsibility of the One Stop system.  There is no set timeframe for reviewing policies but rather they are reviewed as needed.  Examples of when changes might be required are when changes are made to the legislation, when there are significant changes in the availability of funding or in response to customer issues.  Additionally, an employer might have special programs available to their employees that impact the services offered to the laid-off workers.

 

9.  WIA IB & Title III PY05 Performance and System Indicators

The Local Board is responsible for the negotiation and accountability for the WIA Title 1-B performance measures of the local One Stop system [§661.305, §666.310, §666.420].

 

If available at time of plan submittal, insert your PY 2005 negotiated performance standards.  Local PY 2005 performance standards will be negotiated with all local boards once New York State has completed negotiations on statewide standards with the U.S. Department of Labor.  At that time, all local areas will be required to modify their local plans to include the PY 05 standards and make them available for public comment.

 

Measure

Performance

Standard

PY 05

Customer Satisfaction

Program Participants

75%

Employers

73%

Entered Employment Rate

Adults

73%

Dislocated Workers

81%

Older Youth

65%

Retention Rate

Adults

81%

Dislocated Workers

88%

Older Youth

77%

Younger Youth

52%

Earnings Change/Earnings Replacement in Six Months

Adults

$2,850

Dislocated Workers

($1,950)

Older Youth

$2,900

Credential/Diploma Rate

Adults

70%

Dislocated Workers

63%

Older Youth

51%

Younger Youth

52%

Skill Attainment Rate

Younger Youth

73%

 

Describe how the established WIA Performance levels impact services and strategies and how levels are monitored.  Within your response, address the following points:

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to WIA IB and Title III Performance and System Indicators.

·         How are the WIA local performance levels communicated to staff, partners, providers and stakeholders so that their role in helping to achieve those performance levels is understood? 

·         How do newly negotiated performance levels affect current policies, procedures and/or local One Stop system initiatives?

·         Describe the tracking system in place and who is responsible for continuously evaluating WIA performance levels.  How is the evaluation process integrated so that both program and fiscal performance data is analyzed in conjunction with each other to gain a system view?  How are performance issues identified and corrected when they arise? 

 

Various Board committees are involved in the development of policies relating to Performance.  The Skills & Training Committee is responsible for the development of policies relating to the Adult and Dislocated Worker programs.  The Youth Council is responsible for the development of policies relating to the Youth programs.  The Executive Committee is responsible for the development of policies that cross over all programs.

 

WIA performance levels are communicated in a variety of methods.  Staff involved in the delivery of services are made aware of the negotiated performance levels and use these in their daily work processes.   They review participant data in weekly meetings to determine how the delivery of services impact performance measures, and develop strategies to best achieve desired goals.  Partners are made aware of performance standards through the reports that are issued to the committees on a quarterly basis.  The performance measures are included in the RFP process for services contracted to providers.  The contracting process addresses the performance standards and the provider’s role in achieving desired goals.

 

The PY’05 performance levels negotiated by New York State will impact policies, procedures and local initiatives in a variety of ways.  The change in the calculation of the Dislocated Worker Earning Replacement rate will require revising internal procedures for calculating the earnings replacement rate, determining the impact the new rate will have on performance outcomes, and training staff in these procedures.   Service levels could be impacted, as a higher volume of customers will be needed to offset high-wage Dislocated Workers unlikely to meet the earnings replacement standard.    All performance levels will have to be reviewed in relation to the individuals currently being served by the system to determine the impact on outcomes.  Strategies will need to be developed to achieve desired goals.  This could impact policy decisions on future services to be provided through One Stop system.

 

The tracking of WIA Performance occurs at various levels.  The Skills & Training Committee is responsible for the evaluation of program and fiscal performance relating to the Adult and Dislocated Worker programs.  The Youth Council is responsible for the evaluation of program and fiscal performance relating to the Youth programs.  The One-Stop Operator routinely reports not only performance, but also any required corrective action plans to these committees.  All program and fiscal performance results are also reported to the Executive Committee. 

Our WIA Management Team also reviews program and fiscal performance on a monthly basis.  This consists of the Commissioner of Social Services, our One-Stop Operator, and the Director and Associate Director of the Workforce Board.  At this monthly meeting, the Team reviews, in detail, the latest performance data, and any corrective action plans.

 

 

 

Within this plan, the Local Board has provided past performance outcomes, current performance standards, population data and trends, and numbers of individuals served.  Based on your analysis of this information and a consideration of its inter-relatedness:

 

·         Describe the adjustments the Local Board will make to improve performance over the next three years. 

 

The local area has generally done well in meeting the current performance requirements.  To improve current performance, new strategies for obtaining older youth credentials will be explored.  This may involve benchmarking other areas. 

 

With the anticipated transition to common measures, obtaining and disseminating information on the new requirements will be an action taken to both maintain and improve performance over the next three years.  This will involve working with system partners, providing training to promote understanding of the measures, and developing strategies to ensure the measures can be achieved.

 

 

System Indicators

 

Describe any system indicators and standards that have been put in place and how they will be used toward continuous improvement.  Within your response, address the following points:

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to System Indicators.

·         Describe how the Local Board has adopted the system indicators identified by the State Workforce Investment Board (Market Penetration, Repeat Customer Usage, Total System Investment)?

·         Describe any local indicators, in addition to the State Workforce Investment Board’s system indicators (Market Penetration, Repeat Customer Usage, Total System Investment), that have been developed or will be developed by the Local Board.  

·         Identify the partners responsible for providing data to measure attainment of System Indicators.

·         Are partner performance measures known and how does the system’s design support their achievement and any over all standards for the system?

 

The Partners Roundtable is the committee of the Workforce Board responsible for policies related to system indicators.

                  

The local board has adopted the system indicators identified by the State by beginning the process to incorporate these into the One Stop System measures.  The Partners Roundtable is discussing ways of using the system indicators (e.g. market penetration, repeat customer usage) to establish baselines for developing outcome measures.    As a first step in this process, the Board has formed a Business Services team. The Business Services team will work to establish a baseline measure for evaluating the market penetration rate for business customers.  Once this baseline has been established, goals can be set for increasing market penetration.  The Partners are discussing using a similar process for determining baselines for customer use of the system.  Once these baselines are set, goals can be set to improve.  We are also in the process of determining a methodology for calculating return on investment.  Limited access to wage record data makes this a more cumbersome process for us. 

 

At this point, DOL and WIA are partners responsible for providing data to measure attainment of System Indicators.

 

Partner Performance measures specific to program areas are known by the agencies operating those programs.  More needs to be done to share information on performance measures and how we can help one another to achieve them.

 

10. Local Monitoring

It is the role of the Chief Local Elected Official (CLEO) and the Local Workforce Investment Board (LWIB) to conduct financial, program and performance oversight and monitoring in local workforce areas [WIA §117(d)(4)].  As noted in TA #04-2 and #04-19, performance and accountability are key elements of a Local Board’s effective oversight and monitoring plan.

 

·         Identify any subcommittee of the local board that is responsible for policies related to Local Monitoring.

·         How frequently will financial, program and performance monitoring be conducted?  Identify the areas, if any, where the local monitoring goes beyond the minimum standards established in TA #04-19.

·         How does the Board ensure consistency and quality in how monitoring is conducted and results reported?

·         How will monitoring reports be used to improve services, identify systemic problems and initiate corrective action?

·         Under what circumstances will an issue arising from a monitoring report are brought before the full Board? What role will the Board play in requiring corrective action and what challenges does the Board anticipate in taking action on the monitoring reports?

 

All monitoring reports are funneled through the Executive Committee.  The Executive Committee determines what the appropriate actions should be, based on the nature of the reports.  They will also determine the appropriate level of response.  For example, the CLEO would only need to be involved if our monitoring revealed a major problem in fiscal or program performance.  Most issues will be sent back to the appropriate committee to discuss corrective action.  For example, if our monitoring revealed issues with Youth performance or with a subcontractor for Youth services, the Youth Council would be asked to work with the System Operator to develop a suitable corrective action plan.  All committee activity is routinely reported to the Executive Committee and summarized at the Full Board meetings.

 

The focus of all of our committees is the creation of policies that support the needs of our local workforce, and support the achievement of the mandated performance standards.  Occasionally, the requirements to achieve these two objectives can be in conflict.  When this occurs, it is the committee’s responsibility to develop policy and direction that establish priorities and hopefully achieves a balance of the issues.

 

Our initial plan calls for the Program Monitoring and Fiscal Monitoring (Annually), Procurement (Semi-annually), Subrecipient Contract Review and Performance and Accountability (Quarterly), and Subrecipient Expenditure Review (Monthly).  These frequencies will be increased based on the results of the monitoring and overall performance.

 

11. Open Meetings

The Local Board must conduct business in an open manner by making information about the activities of the board available to the public on a regular basis through open meetings [§661.305].

 

·         Describe the process for making information about Board activities, including meeting schedules, available to the public; who is responsible and how often is the information available?  If posted electronically, attach a link to your website.

 

Information regarding the activities of the Board is available on a continuous basis.  The schedule for all Full Board and Committee meetings is posted on the http://www.yourcareerconnection.org/ website, which is maintained by our One-Stop Operator.  We also post information about upcoming meetings (within the next 4-6 weeks) on the website for the Center for Business and Community Development at: http://www.oswego.edu/about/centers/cbcd/index.html

 

A public notice is published in the local newspaper in January of each year with the calendar for the meetings of the Full Board for the year.  We also post a notice on the Workforce Development bulletin board in the Center for Business and Community Development office of the next meeting’s date, time and location.

 

12. Public Comment on Local Plan

The Local Plan must include a description of the process used to provide an opportunity for public comment, including comments by representatives of business and labor organizations, and input into the development of the Local Plan [§661.350].

 

·         Describe how the policy for gathering public comment on the Local Plan has changed since the development of the initial five-year plan and what caused those changes to be made?

·         Describe where/how the current Local Plan was made available for public comment? 

·         Attach a copy of the public comments received in disagreement with the Local Plan and how those disagreements were addressed.

 

We have not made any changes to the policy for gathering public comment on the Local Plan.  The local plan was available for public view at the Fulton One-Stop Center, the Mexico DSS building, and the SUNY Oswego Center for Business & Community Development.  It was also made available on-line at the two websites reference in Section 11.  We invited public comments about the plan by placing a legal notice in all of the local newspapers, including The Valley News, The Palladium Times, and The Oswego County Weeklies.  We also placed a notice on Oswegodailynews.com.  Copies of the notices are attached.

 

We did not receive any comments on the plan from the public.

 

IV.       Required Certifications and Documents

Any attachment requiring original signature must be mailed to the address listed under general instructions.

 

Attachment A:   Request for Extension to Submit Local Plan

Attachment B:   Timeline for Submitting Complete Local Plan

Attachment C:  Signature of Local Board Chair

Attachment D:  Signature of Chief Elected Official

Attachment E.   Units of Local Government

Attachment F:   Fiscal Agent/Grant Subrecipient

Attachment G:  One Stop Operator Information

Attachment H:   Federal and State Certifications

 

In addition, the following documents must be attached for the plan to be complete:

 

Chief Elected Officials Agreement (if applicable)

Local Board By-Laws

One Stop Operator Agreement


ATTACHMENT A:  REQUEST FOR EXTENSION TO SUBMIT LOCAL PLAN

 

A request to extend the deadline for submitting a Comprehensive Three-Year Local Plan beyond the June 30, 2005 date will be considered if the local area justifies that additional time is needed to develop a complete plan.  To request an extended deadline the LWIA must submit the following documents by March 15, 2005:

 

·         Attachment A, Request for Extended Deadline to Submit Local Plan, and 

·         Attachment B, Timeline for Submitting Complete Local Plan

 

Local Plan Extension:  All LWIAs are eligible to request an extension to submit the Local Plan no later than September 30, 2005. 

 

Section II-A Extension:  Those LWIAs that are unable to fully complete Section II-A prior to the deadline for submitting the Local Plan may request an extension to submit this section no later than December 31, 2005.  The December 31, 2005 extended deadline request permits the late submission of only the following plan elements: 

 

Section II-A (2), Engaging Community Partners in Workforce Solutions,

Section II-A (3), Aligning Service Delivery, and

Section II-A (4), Measuring Achievement.

 

 

Local Plan Extension:  The       LWIA requests an extension to submit its Comprehensive Three Year Local Plan from June 30, 2005 to       for the following reasons:       

 

 

 

Section II-A Extension:  The       LWIA requests an extension to submit its completed Section II-A from June 30, 2005 to        for the following reasons:       

 

 

 

Date:

     

Typed Name:

     

Signature of Local Board Chair:

 

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT B:  TIMELINE FOR SUBMITTING COMPLETE LOCAL PLAN

 

When Attachment A, Request for Extended Deadline to Submit Local Plan, is submitted, Attachment B must also be submitted by March 15, 2005 indicating when the Local Area anticipates submitting its completed plan.  As a condition for granting an extended deadline, local areas must identify the date by which they will complete each plan component.  All local areas must meet the NYSDOL Required Completion Dates provided below.

 

When the local area submits its final plan, the entire plan must be submitted.

 

 

 

Area of Plan

NYSDOL Required Completion Dates

LWIA Projected Completion Date

LWIA Profile

 

 

    Profile

September 30

 

Section IIA – Local Area Strategic Planning Process

 

 

    Economic Environment & Key Workforce Issues

September 30

 

    Engaging Community Partners in Workforce

    Solutions

September 30 or December 31

 

    Aligning Service Delivery

September 30 or December 31

 

    Measuring Achievement

September 30 or December 31

 

Section IIB – Local Area Strategic Planning Progress

 

 

      Strategic Planning Progress

September 30

 

Section III – WIA Compliance

 

 

       All Compliance Sections

September 30

 

Section IV– Attachments/Forms

 

 

       All required Attachments and Forms

September 30

 

 

 

Date:

     

Typed Name:

     

Signature of Local Board Chair:

 

 


ATTACHMENT C:  SIGNATURE OF LOCAL BOARD CHAIR

 

WIA Comprehensive Three-Year Local Plan Submittal

July 1, 2005 – June 30, 2008

 

 

In compliance with the provisions of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, the Interim Final Rule, and Planning guidelines and instructions developed by the Governor, this WIA Comprehensive Three-Year Local Plan is being submitted jointly by the Local Board and the respective Chief Elected Official(s).

 

By virtue of my signature, I:

 

Ø      agree to comply with all statutory and regulatory requirements of the Act as well as other applicable state and federal laws, regulations and policies

Ø      affirm that the composition of the Local  Board is in compliance with the law, rules and regulations and is approved by the State

Ø      affirm that this WIA Comprehensive Three-Year Local Plan was developed in collaboration with the Local Board and is jointly submitted with the Chief Elected official(s) on behalf of the Local Board

Ø      agree to comply with § 661.310 by ensuring a firewall exists between the board and the provision of core services, intensive services, training services and the One Stop Operator

 

Date: 

9/1/05

Signature of Local Board Chair:      

Mr.       x

Ms.         

Other      

Typed Name of Local Board Chair:

Roger Locy

Name of Board:

The Workforce Development Board of Oswego County, Inc.

Address 1:

103 Rich Hall

Address 2:

     

City:

Oswego

State:

New York

Zip:  13126

Phone:

315-312-3492

E-mail:  dellapen@oswego.edu

 

Submittal directions:  Complete this form as part of the Local Plan development process and submit the entire Local Plan electronically as described earlier in this guidance.  Submit this form with original signatures to:

 

Workforce Development and Training Division

NYS Department of Labor

Building 12, Room 450

State Office Building Campus

Albany, New York 12240

 

Attention:  Margaret Moree, Director

Local Plan Documents


ATTACHMENT D:  SIGNATURE OF CHIEF ELECTED OFFICIAL

 

WIA Comprehensive Three-Year Local Plan Submittal

July 1, 2005 – June 30, 2008

 

In compliance with the provisions of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, the Interim Final Rule, and Planning guidelines and instructions developed by the Governor, this WIA Comprehensive Three-Year Local Plan is being submitted jointly by the Local Board and the respective Chief Elected Official(s).

 

By virtue of my signature, I:

 

Ø       agree to comply with all statutory and regulatory requirements of the Act as well as other applicable state and federal laws, regulations and policies

Ø       affirm that the Grant recipient possesses the capacity to fulfill all responsibilities and assume liability for funds received, as stipulated in §667.705 of the rules and regulations

Ø       affirm that the composition of the Local  Board is in compliance with the law, rules and regulations and is approved by the State

Ø       affirm that the Chair of the Local  Board was duly elected by that Board

Ø       agree to comply with §661.310 by ensuring a firewall exists between the board and the provision of core services, intensive services, training services and the One Stop Operator

 

Note:  A separate signature sheet is required for each local Chief Elected Official.

 

Date: 

9/1/05

Signature of Local Chief Elected Official (CEO):

 

Mr.       x

Ms.         

Other      

Typed Name of Local CEO:

Russ W. Johnson

Title of Local CEO:

Chairman of the Legislature

Address 1:

County Office Building

Address 2:

46 East Bridge Street

City:

Oswego

State:

New York

Zip:  13126

Phone:

315-349-8230

E-mail:  rjohnson@oswegocounty.com

 

Submittal directions:  Complete this form as part of the Local Plan development process and submit the entire Local Plan electronically as described earlier in this guidance.  Submit this form with original signatures to:

 

Workforce Development and Training Division

NYS Department of Labor

Building 12, Room 450

State Office Building Campus

Albany, New York  12240

 

Attention:  Margaret Moree, Director

Local Plan Documents

ATTACHMENT E:  UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT

 

Where a local area is comprised of multiple counties or jurisdictional areas, provide the names of the individual governmental units

 and identify the grant recipient.

 

 

Unit of Local Government

 

Grant Recipient

Yes

No

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 


ATTACHMENT F:  FISCAL AGENT/GRANT SUBRECIPIENT

 

Identify the Fiscal Agent or a Grant Recipient

to assist in the administration of grant funds.  Provide the names

of the agent and/or subrecipient.

 

Entity

Fiscal Agent

Yes

No

Oswego County

X

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

 

 

 

Entity

 

Grant Subrecipient

Yes

No

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


ATTACHMENT G:  ONE STOP OPERATOR INFORMATION

 

Complete the following information for each locally certified

One Stop Operator in your Workforce Investment Area

 

 

OPERATOR:       

 

Method of Selection

Type of Operator

 

   Consortium

 

x Competitive Bid

 

 

x  System

 

   Center(s)

 

Operator Address:

200 North Second Street

Fulton, NY  13069

Operator Phone:

315-591-9000

E-Mail:

Weaver@OswegoCounty.com

 

Attach a list of all One Stop centers overseen by this Operator and include for each center:

           

Ø      Name/Address/Phone of Center(s)

Ø      Identify Full-Service or Certified Affiliate Site

Ø      Identify Partners On-Site and Frequency On-Site (e.g., half day/week; two days/week)

Ø      Identify Center Hours of Operation

 

OPERATOR CERTIFICATION STATUS 

 

Indicate status of State Level Recertification:

 

    Granted

x  Application Submitted/Pending State Review

    Application Not Yet Due

    Other (explain)

 

     

 


 

ATTACHMENT H:  FEDERAL AND STATE CERTIFICATIONS

 

The funding for the awards granted under this contract is provided by either the United States Department of Labor or the United States Department of Health and Human Services which requires the following certifications:

 

A.      CERTIFICATION REGARDING DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION, INELIGIBILITY AND VOLUNTARY EXCLUSION-LOWER TIER COVERED TRANSACTIONS

 

1.         The prospective lower tier participant certifies, by submission of this proposal, that neither it nor its principals is presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participation in this transaction by any Federal department or agency.

 

2.         Where the prospective lower tier participant is unable to certify to any of the statement in this certification, such prospective participant shall attach an explanation to this proposal.

 

B.     CERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING - Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements

 

By accepting this grant, the signee hereby certifies, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:

 

1.          No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the undersigned, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan or cooperative agreement.

 

2.         If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this Federal contract, grant, loan or cooperative agreement, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form - LLL, "Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying," in accordance with its instructions.

 

3.         The signer shall require that the language of this certification be included in the award documents for all subawards at all tiers (including subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under grants, loans, and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose accordingly.  This certification is a material representation of facts upon which reliance was placed when this transaction was made or entered into.  Submission of this certification is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction imposed by Section 1352, Title 31, U.S.C.  Any person who fails to file the required certification shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.

 

C.    DRUG FREE WORKPLACE.  By signing this application, the grantee certifies that it will provide a Drug Free Workplace by implementing the provisions at 29 CFR 98.630, Appendix C, pertaining to the Drug Free Workplace.  In accordance with these provisions, a list of places where performance of work is done in connection with this specific grant will take place must be maintained at your office and available for Federal inspection.

 

D.     NONDISCRIMINATION & EQUAL OPPORTUNITY ASSURANCE:

 

For contracts funded by the U.S. Department of Labor

 

As a condition to the award of financial assistance from the Department of Labor under Title I of WIA, the grant applicant assures that it will comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws:

 

(1) Section 188 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age disability, political affiliation, or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I - financially assisted program or activity;

 

(2) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin;

 

(3) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities;

 

(4) The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and

 

(5) Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs.

 

The grant applicant also assures that it will comply with 29 CFR Part 37 and all other regulations implementing the laws listed above.  This assurance applies to the grant applicant's operation of the WIA Title I - financially assisted program or activity, and to all agreements the grant applicant makes to carry out the WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity.  The grant applicant understands that the United States has the right to seek judicial enforcement of this assurance.  For grants serving participants in work activities funded through the Welfare-to-Work block grant programs under Section 407(a) of the Social Security Act, the grant applicant shall comply with 20 CFR 645.255.  

 

For contracts funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

 

As a condition to the award of financial assistance from the Department of Labor under Title IV-A of the Social Security Act, the grant applicant assures that it will comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws including but not limited to:

 

(1) Title VI of the Civil rights Act of 1964(P.L. 88-352) and Executive Order Number 11246 as amended by E.O. 11375 relating to Equal Employment Opportunity which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin;

 

(2) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the regulations issued pursuant thereto contained in 45 CFR Part 84 entitled “Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in Programs and Activities Reviewing or Benefiting from Federal Financial Assistance” which prohibit discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities;

 

(3) The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, and the regulations at 45 CFR Part 90 entitled “Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Programs and Activities Reviewing Federal Financial Assistance”. which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age;

 

(4) Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs; and

 

(5) The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, 42 U.S.C. Section 12116, and regulations issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission which implement the employment provisions of the ADA, set forth at 29 CFR Part 1630.

 

The grant applicant also assures that it will comply with 45 CFR Part 80 and all other regulations implementing the laws listed above.  The grant applicant understands that the United States has the right to seek judicial enforcement of this assurance.

 

STATE CERTIFICATIONS

 

E.  CERTIFICATION REGARDING DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION, INELIGIBILITY, AND OUTSTANDING DEBTS

 

The undersigned, as a duly sworn representative of the contractor/vendor, hereby attests and certifies that:

 

1)         No principle or executive officer of the contractor’s/vendor’s company, its subcontractor(s) and/or successor(s) is presently suspended or debarred; and

 

2)         The contractor/vendor, its subcontractor(s) and/or its successor(s) is not ineligible to submit a bid on, or be awarded, any public work contract or sub-contract with the State, any municipal corporation or public body for reason of debarment for failure to pay the prevailing rate of wages, or to provide supplements, in accordance with Article 8 of the New York State Labor Law.

 

3)         The contractor/vendor, its subcontractor(s) and/or its successor do not have any outstanding debts owed to the Department, including but not limited to, contractual obligations, fines related to Safety and Health violations, payments owed to workers for public works projects or the general provisions of the Labor Law, unemployment insurance contributions or other related assessments, penalties or charges.                

 

F. CERTIFICATION REGARDING "NONDISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT IN NORTHERN IRELAND:  MacBRIDE FAIR EMPLOYMENT PRINCIPLES"

 

In accordance with Chapter 807 of the Laws of 1992 the bidder, by submission of this bid, certifies that it or any individual or legal entity in which the bidder holds a 10% or greater ownership interest, or any individual or legal entity that holds a 10% or greater ownership interest in the bidder, either:

 

(answer Yes or No to one or both of the following, as applicable.)

 

1.           Has business operations in Northern Ireland:

 

                        _____ Yes                               ___x__ No

 

            If Yes:

 

2.  Shall take lawful steps in good faith to conduct any business operations they have in Northern Ireland in accordance with the MacBride Fair Employment Principles relating to nondiscrimination in employment and freedom of workplace opportunity regarding such operations in Northern Ireland, and shall permit independent monitoring of its compliance with such Principles.

 

                        _____ Yes                   _____ No

 

G.  NON-COLLUSIVE BIDDING CERTIFICATION

 

By submission of this bid, each bidder and each person signing on behalf of any bidder certifies, and in the case of a joint bid each party thereto certifies as to its own organization, under penalty of perjury, that to the best of his or her knowledge and belief:

 

            1.      The prices in this bid have been arrived at independently without collusion, consultation, communication, or agreement, for the purpose of restricting competition, as to any matter relating to such prices with any other bidder or with any competitor;

 

            2.      Unless otherwise required by law, the prices which have been quoted in this bid have not been knowingly disclosed by the bidder and will not knowingly be disclosed by the bidder prior to opening, directly or indirectly, to any other bidder or to any competitor; and

            3.      No attempt has been made or will be made by the bidder to induce any other person, partnership or corporation to submit or not to submit to bid for the purpose of restricting competition.

 

I, the undersigned, attest under penalty of perjury that I am an authorized representative of the Bidder/Contractor and that the foregoing statements are true and accurate.

 

 

Signature of Authorized Representative

 

 

Title